NYC Confirms 58 Measles Cases in Brooklyn’s Orthodox Jewish Community

Measles virus is transmitted by airborne particles, droplets, and direct contact with the respiratory secretions of an infected person

young boy reading prayers

The City of New York announced on January 16, 2019, there have been 58 confirmed cases of measles in the Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn, NY. 

The initial child with measles was unvaccinated and acquired measles on a visit to Israel during October 2018, where a large outbreak of the disease is occurring. 

Since last October, there have been additional children living in Brooklyn who were unvaccinated and acquired measles while visiting Israel. 

Additionally, children who did not travel to Israel were also infected in Brooklyn and Rockland County. 

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says the measles virus is transmitted by airborne particles, droplets, and direct contact with the respiratory secretions of an infected person. 

Young children, the immunocompromised, and non-immune pregnant women are at highest risk for severe complications from the measles virus, says the CDC.   

The Brooklyn neighborhoods that have reported measles cases since October 2018 are as follows: 

  • Bensonhurst: 1 confirmed measles case (no new cases since November 2018)
  • Borough Park: 35 confirmed measles cases (3 new cases in the past week)
  • Midwood/Marine Park: 1 confirmed measles case (no new cases since November 2018)
  • Williamsburg: 21 confirmed measles cases (no new cases in the past week)

The NYC Health Department says on a website statement that ‘if you plan to travel to Israel, protect yourself and your family against measles and get vaccinated with the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine at least 2 weeks in advance of your trip.’ 

Recommended:

And, ‘if you have traveled to Israel and you have a fever, cough, red eyes, runny nose, and body rash, contact your doctor. 

Moreover, NYC Health says ‘people at risk should call your doctor before going to their office to prevent exposing other people to measles.’ 

“Although measles is preventable, too many families are choosing to not vaccinate or delay vaccination, putting their children and other children at risk,” said Acting Health Commissioner Dr. Oxiris Barbot in a previous press release. 

“It is also important to make sure the entire family is protected before traveling internationally because outbreaks of measles are occurring in throughout Europe.” 

In the USA, two approved measles vaccines are available, MMR-II and ProQuad. 

International travelers can request a vaccine appointment with a pharmacy at Vax-Before-Travel.

The CDC Vaccine Price List provides the private sector vaccine prices for general information. 

And, MMR vaccine discounts can be found here.